Combined ShapeCreated with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Combined ShapeCreated with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Combined ShapeCreated with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch. Fill 1Created with Sketch.

The Complete Guide to Making Spray Paint Easter Eggs

Making spray paint Easter eggs is so easy and fast! It’s a no-dye alternative that creates colorful, bright, saturated eggs. Read on for the tutorial.

How to Dye Easter Eggs with Spray Paint
How to Dye Easter Eggs with Spray Paint

Sharing no-dye Easter egg tutorials is one of my favorite things to do here during the spring. I love Easter egg season!

And I recently realized that I’ve been sharing lots of tutorials that involve spray painting the eggs, but never really went into detail. It’s my favorite way to color eggs if you’re not dying them — quick, easy, and gives a major punch of color.

But there are a few techniques that are worth sharing, so here’s the official Complete Guide to Making Spray Paint Easter Eggs! 

Psst – be sure to sign up below for my VIP group, where I’ll send more of my very best DIYs, recipes, and ideas straight to ya!

Spray Paint Egg Ideas

If you dig into our archives, you’ll see these spray paint Easter eggs in action, in lots of our egg decorating tutorials! Here are a few below — check them out for some inspiration.

Considerations when Spray Painting Easter Eggs

When you’re creating spray paint Easter eggs, there are lots of variables that can create different outcomes.

Read below for a complete guide to making it work and getting the best result.

Real vs. Faux Eggs

The eggs that you see here (and in the majority of our spray paint Easter egg projects) are real eggs. But if you want to be able to reuse your eggs year after year, consider using faux eggs.

Egg Temperature

First and most important tip? Always start with room temperature eggs.

Too hot and the paint will slide off, too cold and the eventual condensation will make the paint uneven or not stick at all. I recommend leaving them out for at least a couple of hours before you start painting.

Preparing eggs for Spray Paint

Prep your eggs by giving them a little wipe with a dry cloth to make sure any debris is removed. We used chicken eggs from my dad’s farm so we washed, dried, and wiped them down.

And by the way, I actually found that I like the way the brown eggs took the paint a little better than regular white eggs. It made for a nice saturated color and took fewer coats to achieve.

Spread some cardboard or newspaper out in a well-ventilated area to create a base for painting.

Choosing the Right Spray Paint

When you’re choosing spray paints, consider a few things.

First, your best bet is to find a can of paint that will spray upside-down and sideways. Otherwise it’s tough to get an even coat of paint all the way around the eggs.

Also, keep finish in mind. I personally prefer a satin finish, and I find that it is the most forgiving if you smudge the paint.

A glossy paint looks great but is a more modern look and shows every little “oops.”

Below is an image of all the eggs we painted. The orangey-red one was painted with a can that had a glossy finish; you can really see the difference.

How to Dye Easter Eggs with Spray Paint

Spray Technique

Once you get the hang of spray painting eggs, it’s a piece of cake. It just takes a light hand and a little patience.

Spray from a distance of about 6″ from the egg. Any closer and you’ll definitely get drips and pooling in your paint. Keep your can moving, rather than stopping in one area (that will make drips, too).

Start with one side of the egg and spray a light coat of color, getting around as much of the underside of the egg as you can. Allow to dry for about 5-10 minutes.

Give the same side another coat with the same technique and allow to dry again. Then flip the egg over and place it on a clean area of your cardboard or newspaper.

If you place it in the same spot you may smudge the paint. Spray two coats on the back side, paying attention to the overlapping area and trying to finesse any spray marks.

How to Dye Easter Eggs with Spray Paint
How to Dye Easter Eggs with Spray Paint

Fixing Mistakes

Sometime you just mess up! No biggie.

If you smudge an egg, I recommend wiping the smudge right away with the corner of a paper towel and covering with a fresh coat of paint. Sometimes you may overspray and end up with drips; you can try the same wiping technique.

If the drips are too out of control, sometimes I just call that the back of the egg and disguise it with some Easter grass when I put it out on display. No shame in my game.

So that’s about it, gang! Hope you test this out sometime. It’s a really fun way to color eggs and you can add to it in all kinds of creative ways!

Be sure to rate our DIY below if you try it out. xoxo

How to Dye Easter Eggs with Spray Paint
The Complete Guide to Making Spray Paint Easter Eggs

The Complete Guide to Making Spray Paint Easter Eggs

Yield: Spray Paint Easter Eggs
Active Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Difficulty: Easy
Estimated Cost: $15

Using spray paint to color Easter eggs is quick, easy, and yields vibrant and colorful eggs!

Materials

  • real or faux eggs
  • spray paint

Tools

  • rags
  • cardboard

Instructions

    1. Spray from a distance of about 6" from the egg. Any closer and you'll definitely get drips and pooling in your paint. Keep your can moving, rather than stopping in one area (that will make drips, too).
    2. Start with one side of the egg and spray a light coat of color, getting around as much of the underside of the egg as you can. Allow to dry for about 5-10 minutes.
    3. Give the same side another coat with the same technique and allow to dry again. Then flip the egg over and place it on a clean area of your cardboard or newspaper.
    4. If you place it in the same spot you may smudge the paint. Spray two coats on the back side, paying attention to the overlapping area and trying to finesse any spray marks.

Notes

Prep your eggs by giving them a little wipe with a dry cloth to make sure any debris is removed. We used chicken eggs from my dad's farm so we washed, dried, and wiped them down.

And by the way, I actually found that I like the way the brown eggs took the paint a little better than regular white eggs. It made for a nice saturated color and took fewer coats to achieve.

Spread some cardboard or newspaper out in a well-ventilated area to create a base for painting.

This post contains affiliate links for your convenience. This means that I make at small commission should you make a purchase via one of these links, at no additional cost to you. Thank you as always for your support!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

7 thoughts on “The Complete Guide to Making Spray Paint Easter Eggs

  1. Pingback: How to Spray Paint Easter Eggs - Makers Bakers Movers & Shakers
  2. I have read through other blogs, but they are cumbersome and confusing more than your post. I hope you continue to have such quality articles to share with everyone! I believe a lot of people will be like to read this article!

Skip to Instructions Scroll back to top