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How to Make Money with Cricut

Cricut machines aren’t just an incredible crafting tool, they can be an amazing way to start your own crafting business. If you want to learn how to make money with Cricut, here’s a detailed breakdown of everything to consider!

how to make money with cricut

Welcome back to the final installment of our info series, all about my favorite crafting tool! I’ve been a Cricut customer and partner for 8 years, and it’s still my most utilized tool.

So today, to help support your crafting adventures, let’s do a deep dive into all of the considerations that go into deciding to make money with your Cricut!

To back it up just a bit, be sure that you’ve seen the previous posts in our series. They’ll really help inform your decisions when it comes choosing and using your machine:

How to Make Money with Your Cricut

If you’ve dipped a toe into online maker sites like Etsy, or even been to a local maker’s market near you, I’ll bet you’ve seen your fair share of entrepreneurs using their Cricut machines to make money.

How much money am I talking? Well, that depends on a lot of things. There are many different factors that will determine how much money you can make with Cricut, but here are a few to consider:

  • time invested
  • effort invested
  • popularity and uniqueness of your product
  • quality of your product
  • overhead (materials, storefronts, assistants, etc.)
  • work-life balance

There are certainly makers who go all in and make a full-time living with their creations. And there are also plenty of others who want to invest less time, and can make spending cash or enough to cover the costs of their crafting supplies.

So let’s dive in and take a closer look!

Things To Consider When You Want to Make Money with Cricut

When you decide you want to make money with your Cricut, it’s best to have a clear plan, goals, and expecations.

It’s also a really good idea to examine the specifics of being an artist vendor, so you know what you’re getting into.

Consider Your Niche

First, consider your niche! What will you be making?

Here are a few great questions to ask yourself while you’re figuring out your niche market.

  • What do I love making?
  • Is there a market/need/demand for this item?
  • Is that market saturated (i.e. do hundreds of people already sell this exact thing)?
  • If so, how can I differentiate my product?
  • Who am I selling to?
  • Is my niche too broad? Too narrow?
how to make money with cricut

Where Will You Sell?

Next up in your plan to make money with your Cricut, make a plan for where you would like to sell your items or product.

Are you imagining selling in person? If so, it’s a good idea to explore local craft fairs, farmers markets, maker markets, or storefronts who may purchase wholesale.

Remember that in-person sales can come with overhead expenses like booth or stall fees, percentage cuts, and so on.

If you’re imagining selling online, do some research into sites like Etsy that make it easy to open a digital shop. You can also hire a web designer to help build your own online shop, separate from any other previously existing platforms.

To go this direction, expenses may include percentages of your earnings or the cost of building and hosting your own website.

Cost of Materials

This goes for any manufacturing business, but do the math on your product cost to ensure that you’re creating items that won’t break your bank!

You can search through tons of Cricut supplies here to get an idea of cost and which materials are the best to use.

For reference, I always use Cricut supplies (like vinyl, iron-on, etc.) rather than going off-brand because I feel that they are the best quality and the longest lasting.

Also, once you’re up and running, consider purchasing materials in bulk to save money.

Shipping Considerations

If you’re selling in-person — congrats! You have no shipping costs.

However, if you’re looking into selling online, there are a few points to make sure that you cover before you begin selling.

  • How big/bulky/heavy is my product?
  • What is the best shipping material to help my items arrive safely? How much does it cost?
  • Will I ship internationally?
  • Should I do flat-rate shipping, or calculate on a case-by-case basis?
  • Do I want to include any special shipping items to improve customer experience (stickers, postcards, etc.)?
how to make money with cricut

Pay attention to this one gang, it’s important!

When you decide to try to make money with your Cricut, you probably have some ideas in mind for product. Just keep in mind as you’re designing your items that there are certain guidelines you must follow with regards to copyrighted images.

Cricut has an Angel Policy, which provides limited permission to use certain Cricut designs in your products and sell those designs legally (up to a point). Basically, any image in Cricut Design Space with a green “A” on it is covered in the Angel Policy.

You can create and sell up to 10,000 products annually, using these images.

However! This does not apply to licensed characters or images. So it’s never okay to create and sell an item using Cricut designs with licensed characters (some examples: Disney, Warner Bros., Hello Kitty, etc.).

Before you create your designs, I highly recommend reading the Angel Policy and having a crystal clear understanding of the parameters.

PRicing Your Items

There are lots of ways to price your product, but in the end you want to make sure that you’re making a profit!

Here’s what you need to know before you price your product:

  • How much does it cost in supplies to make?
  • How many hours does it take to make?
  • What do you want your hourly rate to be?
  • How much is your overhead?

Once you know those numbers, plug them in to an equation like this one:

  • Your Desired Hourly Rate x Time Spent = Base Cost
  • Base Cost + Supply Cost = Product Cost A
  • Supply Cost x 3 = Product Cost B
  • Product Cost A + Product Cost B, divided by 2 = Product Cost C

Product Cost A is based on materials and work, Product Cost B is based solely on materials. And Product Cost C is the average of the two.

Once you have your average, do a little market research and find out pricing for similar products online. If you find that you’re way out of line with the general average cost of a similar product, adjust as needed.

Why Do You Want to Make Money with Cricut?

Finally, it’s a good idea just to do a gut check and examine why you want to make money with your Cricut!

Your motivation could be anything from the desire for a creative outlet, to a hope for a little cash on the side, to a dream of owning a creative business.

But whatever your motivation is, be sure that it’s enough to keep you going.

More Ideas of Cricut Crafts to Sell

And now, the fun part! Check out these ideas of some Cricut crafts to sell to get your ideas flowing. Always be sure to put your own spin on your designs. Have fun! xoxo

how to make money with cricut

This post is sponsored by Cricut. All ideas and opinions are my very own. Thank you for supporting the brands who help keep Lovely Indeed rocking!

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