This Week + Throwing Things

Toddler Boy

Guys. I need parenting help. I don’t care if you’re parents or not — help! My sweet, funny, energetic toddler won’t. stop. throwing things. It’s not even out of anger or anything. It’s more like he just wants to see what happens when he throws them. But Lord help me, it makes me crazy. He tosses his toys everywhere (and the last thing I want to be doing is getting down on the floor to dig toys out from under the couch), he chucks books so they almost chop my feet off, and he throws his cups on the floor at meal times. And after he throws the stuff he just looks at it like, “Huh. Well there ya go.” And then he says, “Henry fro dat.”

We talk allllll the time about how we don’t throw, how it’s dangerous and it makes a mess and none of his friends or family throw things. And when we’re talking he looks at me all earnest and I swear he understands. I know he does! But then he chucks his Legos everywhere just to see them scatter and it’s all I can do to keep from tearing my hair out. That freakin’ adorable jerk.

So. Any parents deal with this? Anybody have a penchant for throwing things when they were little? I’m all ears, gang. And in the meantime, you can laugh at me while I’m on my hands and knees wiping up the cup of milk that my kid just tossed overboard.

Oh and hey — have a great weekend! xoxo

  1. Oh yes. The throwing phase… the never ending throwing. My son definitely went through that and I think it’s a right of passage. Our rule is you can “toss” not throw things inside the house. Throwing is for outside. If he wanted to throw, he was completely allowed to but it had to be a ball and it had to be outside. That way he could still throw, but I was guiding him where it was allowed. Not that will solve the problem, but at least it’s a start…. good luck! 😉

  2. Elaine Costa on said:

    I think he needs a basketball hoop! 😀 <3 <3 <3

  3. Caitlin Grant on said:

    Hang in there, it’s a phase. You’re doing great at being consistent! He’ll eventually get it. Mine is a couple months older than yours. He’s just out of the throwing phase, and now he’s into banging when he isn’t getting enough attention. It too, shall pass. I feel like that’s all we need as parents are reminders that they do grow out of it eventually if you keep working on it! And you are, so he will! You got this.

  4. Amy on said:

    We’re going through the same thing with Louie! Every time he throws something, we tell him to go pick it up and bring it to us (my husband or me). When he brings it over, we tell Louie to be “nice” to the toy, in which we nicely pet the item. Recently, he has started to repeat the “nice” and pet the item too. He is still throwing things, but a lot less often…at least for now – we hope this works!

  5. My 23 month old is doing the same thing. I heard it’s because they’re testing out cause and effect. One thing I read, tho it hasn’t *completely helped us, is telling him what objects he IS allowed to throw- soft toys, pillows, balls outside, etc. Worth a shot!

  6. Hedwig on said:

    Let him help gathering his blocks again. That’s the learning curve here. I know all about it… I had twins (boys). It helped a lot that they needed to pick up after throwing. Of course I helped but they needed to clean up after themselves. And key is to make it fun. One needed to pick up all the red ones while the other picked up another color… That way … The throwing phase ended quite soon without trauma’s or a mother-gone-mad, and now they are 13 years old and the “picking up after themselves” is incorporated in their behaviour. Soooo good luck !!!!

  7. debby on said:

    As a mom and an early childhood teacher. Put everything he throws into a laundry basket in a closet. Call it a time out or a toy jail. Give him ways to earn back one piece at a time .
    If he goes to a daycare his throwing could really hurt someone , for instance wooden blocks.
    If he knows the things are going away he may stop and think about it. It may not work for awhile..
    Good luck. It could be worse, he could be a biter, hah.

    • Rae on said:

      No kids here, but I used to babysit and employed the same tact my parents used on my and my siblings – take it away. No second chances. No warnings. Just gone. It didn’t matter what it was. Or if we threw something that got stuck or rolled away somewhere unreachable, it got left there. It was retrieved later, but it never happened immediately – you threw it, it got stuck, now you have to play with something else. He’s learning cause and effect – if I drop this, it makes this sound. But he’ll also learn consequences – if I throw this, it gets taken away.

  8. Rae on said:

    No kids here, but I used to babysit and employed the same tact my parents used on my and my siblings – take it away. No second chances. No warnings. Just gone. It didn’t matter what it was. Or if we threw something that got stuck or rolled away somewhere unreachable, it got left there. It was retrieved later, but it never happened immediately – you threw it, it got stuck, now you have to play with something else. He’s learning cause and effect – if I drop this, it makes this sound. But he’ll also learn consequences – if I throw this, it gets taken away.

  9. Jessica Thiessen on said:

    You are already doing an incredible job. When kids go through a new, especially infuriating, phase, it feels like it will never end. It WILL end. You guys are doing what you can to explain dangers. Well well well done! It’s so hard when toddlers go through all this weird stuff but my advice is to simply do your best and leave it at that. Don’t beat yourself up.

    Our kid did that (and our twins are starting now too) and all we did was take away the dangerous toys to throw when they threw it and encouraged them to throw soft stuff instead. Gosh I hate the part of parenting where you really start to discipline. I know it’s necessary and good blah blah blah but it’s hard.

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